nativeamericannews:

How Native Americans Were Crucial To Defeat The Nazis And Japan In WWII
This is Chester Nez, the last of the original Navajo 29, being honoured at an April 4 ceremony. If it weren’t for him and the other 28 Native Americans who created the secret code language used in the Pacific theatre during World War II, America would have probably never won the war against Japan.

nativeamericannews:

How Native Americans Were Crucial To Defeat The Nazis And Japan In WWII

This is Chester Nez, the last of the original Navajo 29, being honoured at an April 4 ceremony. If it weren’t for him and the other 28 Native Americans who created the secret code language used in the Pacific theatre during World War II, America would have probably never won the war against Japan.

(Source: gizmodo.com.au, via the-uncensored-she)

bana05:

I wanted my first-year film students to understand what happens to a story when actual human beings inhabit your characters, and the way they can inspire storytelling. And I wanted to teach them how to look at headshots and what you might be able to tell from a headshot. So for the past few years I’ve done a small experiment with them.

It works like this: I bring in my giant file of head shots, which include actors of all races, sizes, shapes, ages, and experience levels. Each student picks a head shot from the stack and gets a few minutes to sit with the person’s face and then make up a little story about them. 

Namely, for white men, they have no trouble coming up with an entire history, job, role, genre, time, place, and costume. They will often identify him without prompting as “the main character.” The only exception? “He would play the gay guy.” For white women, they mostly do not come up with a job (even though it was specifically asked for), and they will identify her by her relationships. “She would play the mom/wife/love interest/best friend.” I’ve heard “She would play the slut” or “She would play the hot girl.” A lot more than once.

For nonwhite men, it can be equally depressing. “He’s in a buddy cop movie, but he’s not the main guy, he’s the partner.” “He’d play a terrorist.” “He’d play a drug dealer.” “A thug.” “A hustler.” “Homeless guy.” One Asian actor was promoted to “villain.”

For nonwhite women (grab onto something sturdy, like a big glass of strong liquor), sometimes they are “lucky” enough to be classified as the girlfriend/love interest/mom, but I have also heard things like “Well, she’d be in a romantic comedy, but as the friend, you know?” “Maid.” “Prostitute.” “Drug addict.”

I should point out that the responses are similar whether the group is all or mostly-white or extremely racially mixed, and all the groups I’ve tried this with have been about equally balanced between men and women, though individual responses vary. Women do a little better with women, and people of color do a little better with people of color, but female students sometimes forget to come up with a job for female actors and black male students sometimes tell the class that their black male actor wouldn’t be the main guy.

Once the students have made their pitches, we interrogate their opinions. “You seem really sure that he’s not the main character – why? What made you automatically say that?” “You said she was a mom. Was she born a mom, or did she maybe do something else with her life before her magic womb opened up and gave her an identity? Who is she as a person?” In the case of the “thug“, it turns out that the student was just reading off his film resume. This brilliant African American actor who regularly brings houses down doing Shakespeare on the stage and more than once made me weep at the beauty and subtlety of his performances, had a list of film credits that just said “Thug #4.” “Gang member.” “Muscle.” Because that’s the film work he can get. Because it puts food on his table.

So, the first time I did this exercise, I didn’t know that it would turn into a lesson on racism, sexism, and every other kind of -ism. I thought it was just about casting. But now I know that casting is never just about casting, and this day is a real teachable opportunity. Because if we do this right, we get to the really awkward silence, where the (now mortified) students try to sink into their chairs. Because, hey, most of them are proud Obama voters! They have been raised by feminist moms! They don’t want to be or see themselves as being racist or sexist. But their own racism and sexism is running amok in the room, and it’s awkward.

This for every time someone criticizes how characters of color and female characters of color especially are treated in text and by subsequent fandoms.  It’s never “just a television/movie/book”. It’s never been ”just”.

(Source: letthetruthlaugh, via licoriceplease)

stoicmeditations:

blackamazon:

masteradept:

queenconsuelabananahammock:

science-sexual:

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 
The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.
An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.
For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.
It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.
That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.
This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…
(Read Full Text)

This is the kind of shit that gets civil wars started. 

Are any of us surprised by this? People have been saying the same thing for a while now. 

…well maybe we will actually have some revolution.

So Princeton needed how much money to figure out what POC have said for years

The US is overdue for a revolution.

stoicmeditations:

blackamazon:

masteradept:

queenconsuelabananahammock:

science-sexual:

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

This is the kind of shit that gets civil wars started. 

Are any of us surprised by this? People have been saying the same thing for a while now. 

…well maybe we will actually have some revolution.

So Princeton needed how much money to figure out what POC have said for years

The US is overdue for a revolution.

(via licoriceplease)

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

plansfornigel:

sadurdaynight:

female-only:

plansfornigel:

and these are the men women are suppose to call when raped. what is this rape culture you speak of ?

this makes me so mad not every fucking cop is a rapist 

When Cops Rape … and Nothing Happens

“Police sexual misconduct is common, and anyone who maintains it isn’t doesn’t get it,” says retired Seattle police chief Norm Stamper, author of the book Breaking Rank. Since no one is investing resources in learning how many victims are out there, we’re left with estimates and news accounts. As part of a 2008 study, former police officer Tim Maher, a criminologist at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, asked 20 police chiefs whether police sexual misconduct was a problem; 18 responded in the affirmative. The 13 chiefs willing to offer estimates thought an average of 19 percent of cops were involved—if correct, that translates to more than 150,000 police officers nationwide. An informal effort by the Cato Institute in 2010 to track the number of police sexual-misconduct cases just in news stories counted 618 complaints nationwide that year, 354 of which involved forcible nonconsensual sexual activity like sexual assault or sexual battery.

Police Sergeant Doubled as Serial Rapist

It was nothing short of a nightmare — a man obsessively tracking women, sneaking into their homes, assaulting them, and forcing them to perform a bizarre “cleansing” ritual that washed away any hint of evidence from their bodies. Bloomington, Ill., Police Detective Clay Wheeler spent two years pursuing the first serial rapist in his town’s memory.

“I’ve seen more brutal things, more violent things, but some of the things that happened and what he would say and tell these girls as he’s assaulting them, and I mean, I get chills. It just disgusts me,” he said.

According to the 3rd Quarter Report of The National Police Misconduct Statistics and Reporting Project, police officers were accused of sexual assault at a rate of 79 per 100,000 law enforcement personal. The rate of accusations for the general public is 28.7 per 100,000 general public. When corrected for gender these numbers tell us that there are 1.5 times more accusations of sexual assualt among male law enforcement officers than among the general male population. The fact that rapists seem to be concentrated among a group of armed individuals who have the purported authority to detain and arrest other individuals should be more than a little alarming for even the most prolific police bootlicker. In just the last month, several stories of officers committing disgusting crimes have been in the news.

and these are the people supposedly “helping” sex workers; these are the people with the power to “rescue” us.  

(via farawaymooncall)

(Source: n-a-blue-box, via thebicker)

zemmer:

WHEN PEOPLE SAY YOU HAVE PRIVILEGE THEY ARE NOT SAYING THAT YOU DON’T HAVE ANY PROBLEMS

THEY ARE SAYING YOU DO NOT HAVE THE SPECIFIC PROBLEMS THAT COME FROM OPPRESSION

THIS IS NOT A DIFFICULT CONCEPT

(via weareallmixedup)

aljazeeraamerica:

Continue reading

In other news, water is wet.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

thegirlwiththeloontattoo:

People say “phase” like impermanence means insignificance. Show me a permanent state of the self.

(via smitethepatriarchy)

Tags: mind blown

misogyny is a room full of broken glass

  • Woman: Holy shit, this room is full of broken glass!
  • Man: What are you talking about?
  • Woman: This room, right here, is full of fucking glass shards, all over the floor.
  • Man: Oh, I guess I see a big pile there over by the window. It's okay, you know windows are gonna break sometimes, you expect it and you should just ignore it.
  • Woman: No, I'm saying there is broken glass ALL OVER THE FLOOR.
  • Man: Okay, I think you're overreacting. Look, there's a perfectly intact glass in the cupboard right there. I can see it. Not all the glass is broken.
  • Woman: That's great, I don't care about one fucking glass out of a thousand not being broken. We need to clean this up.
  • Man: I only broke like one or two glasses, and it was a while ago, and I really don't think I break glasses anymore. Most of this mess was here when I got here.
  • Woman: But you're here, right now, and you can help me clean it up.
  • Man: Why do we have to clean it all up? I saw someone come in here and clear a little away earlier, isn't that enough?
  • Woman: No! We have to pick up EVERY LAST SHARD of glass. Even a tiny shard is going to hurt someone really badly.
  • Man: What? You're crazy! That's never going to happen! You glass cleaners are so unrealistic. You should just ignore it. Talking about it is making it worse.
  • Woman: I'm going to point out every last piece of broken glass until it is all picked up.
  • Man: Well, whatever, I'm not helping you clean it up.

whoobin:

I am so over people thinking that Leis look like this: 

image

A lei takes hard time and vigorous work. We (Hawaiians) wake up at the crack of dawn to gather whats needed to make the lei that we want. It can take hours or days to make the leis and Hawaiian’s make leis with only good intentions and love because they believe that if you make a lei with malicious intent it will come out into the lei. There is many different ways to make leis and we also make leis from shells and feathers. It isn’t only Hawai’i that makes leis but throughout Polynesia fellow Polynesians make leis in their own style. 

To call the above image a lei is disrespectful to my culture and I want that shit to stop. That isn’t a lei, the images in the photoset are leis. 

(via licoriceplease)